In order to meet the challenges in front of us in the East Jemez we need to break through the barriers that prevent true interdisciplinary work. Combining humanities, natural and social sciences, economics, and traditional ways of understanding the world takes a deliberate effort. We are working with artists, local storytellers, landscape architects, and scientists to develop ideas and experiments for action in the East Jemez. We will use these collaborations to help guide the restoration and management efforts moving forward. 

 

There are several ongoing projects and various ways for you to get involved:

Art & Story

Firescar

Firescar

monoprint by Kate Aitchison from Burnished Landscape

Entrada Recon

Entrada Recon

photo credit Kate Aitchison from "Uplift"

torch and log

torch and log

Craig Goodworth working on his piece for Fires of Change. credit: Mari Cleven

Dead Juniper

Dead Juniper

Taken on the Boundary Peak trail in Bandelier National Monument. credit: Collin Haffey

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

by Bryan David Griffith for Fires of Change

Composition for Forests

Composition for Forests

by Shawn Skabelund

Fire demo

Fire demo

fire fighter demonstrates ignition of a drip torch during the Fires of Change workshop

Afterglow

Afterglow

monoprint by Kate Aitchison from Burnished Landscape

The Edge Effect: re-Imagining Place in the East Jemez

The culminating exhibit from Shawn Skabelund and Kathleen Brennan's 2017 Artists in Residency opens on April 21, 2018 in the historic fire tower of Bandelier National Monument. Read more about the exhibit here, at Brennan's website

Calendar of Special Events

 

Artists in Residence

Shawn Skabelund and Kathleen Brennan served as the EJLF Artists in Residence in 2017, hosted at Bandelier National Monument. During their residency, they explored the altered landscapes with managers and scientists learning about the ways places and people are recovering from the recent severe disturbances. They have continued to reach out to local communities, both old and new, to gain a better understanding of the perspectives for the future in the East Jemez. 

 

Stories of landscape change

The data we collect and the pictures we take can tell us how a place has changed over time and what specific areas used to look like, but those things alone can't tell us how a place used to feel or what made that place so special. We need stories for that. We are working to collect stories from all over the eastern Jemez, from people with long and short connections to this place. We hope the stories will help guide the land management choices in the future and be integrated into the planning efforts moving forward. If you have a story you'd like to share, please contact us

 

Previous efforts

A few examples of our previous art-science-conservation efforts: 

The East Jemez Landscape Futures Project is jointly funded by:
Bandelier National Monument , the Landscape Conservation Initiative, and the USGS New Mexico Landscapes Field Station

Dead Juniper

Taken on the Boundary Peak trail in Bandelier National Monument. credit: Collin Haffey